Another Song for the Lord's Supper

07:15

As a postscript to last week's post on songs for communion, here's one more.

Zac Hicks has taken a communion hymn written by Joseph Hart in the 1750s and transformed it into a contemporary worship song on his new album, Without Our Aid. It's a great album, the aim of which

'is to combine the energy and vitality of the modern worship sound (made most popular by groups like Passion and Hillsong), with the depth, theology, and historical connectedness of Christian hymnody across time.'
Lord I Believe is a communion hymn that includes both our feeding on Christ and the meaning of the Cross. Here are the last two verses:

I eat the bread and drink the wine,
But, O, my soul wants more than sign!
I faint unless I feed on Thee,
And drink the blood as shed for me.

For sinners, Lord, Thou cam’st to bleed,
And I’m a sinner vile, indeed.
Lord, I believe Thy grace is free.
O magnify that grace in me.

The MP3 is available for free from Justin Taylor's site, and you can get the lead sheet and chord chart from Zac Hicks' site. Check out the rest of the album too on Bandcamp.

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The Tenets of the Apostolic Church


The Unity of the Godhead, and Trinity of the Persons therein.

The utter depravity of human nature, the necessity for repentance and regeneration and the eternal doom of the finally impenitent.

The virgin birth, sinless life, atoning death, triumphant resurrection, ascension, and abiding intercession of our Lord Jesus Christ; His second coming, and millennial reign upon earth.

Justification and Sanctification of the believer through the finished work of Christ.

The Baptism of the Holy Ghost for believers, with signs following.

The nine gifts of the Holy Ghost for the edification, exhortation and comfort of the Church, which is the body of Christ.

The Sacraments of Baptism by immersion and of the Lord's Supper.

The Divine inspiration and authority of the Holy Scriptures.

Church government by apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, teachers, elders and deacons.

The possibility of falling from grace.

The obligatory nature of tithes and offerings.